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Bathroom Remodel Part 5: Dress It Up

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An accent band can add a classy touch, and break up an otherwise monotonous installation. The options for accent bands are as varied as tile choices. Whatever you decide on, keep in mind that the accent tile needs to be the same thickness as the wall tile, if you want a smooth transition. A thinner accent will, most likely, be recessed relative to the wall tile, and of course a thicker accent will stick out. This may not matter to you, but it’s something to consider.

If you’re having a glass enclosure installed around your finished shower, talk to the shower door installer before installing an accent strip that’s not flush with the wall. If you use, for instance, river stone as an accent and it sticks out from the wall, you may need to stop the band short of the glass. The enclosure, most likely will need a surface that’s flush from bottom to top. Anything sticking out from the wall will prevent┬áthe enclosure from fitting properly or may make installation impossible.

A border, or rug inlay can turn a plain floor into a work of art. The displays you see at the tile store may look great, but be completely unfeasible for your particular bathroom layout. Carefully map out your preferred accent location, and be certain you can achieve the effect you want with the materials you choose. The best way to do this is to lay out the actual tiles, using grout joint spacers of the desired size so you can head off potential problems in time to do any necessary redesign. Inlays and borders can be tricky when dealing with vanities, dividing walls that jut out into the floor, and odd shaped rooms. But with some advanced planing most installations can be dressed-up with accents that make the room pop.

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